Saturday, August 05, 2006

Not Good





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11 comments:

Bloggerwife said...

We had a horticulturalist tell us that this is a fruited growth and it indicated that the tree was stressed. He also said we could investigate the problem further by having a team dig extensively among the roots of this grandfather oak. When I asked how much that would cost, he sort of rolled his eyes, and said "alot."

TreeLover said...

Bloggerwife: is this a Laurel Oak or a Live Oak? Mushrooms like this are a sure sign that the tree is beginning the process of dying (which could take years) and that there is decay at the location where the mushrooms are growing.

DigTheDark said...

I would disagree that the tree is definitely dieing..these are just the summer humid months that fungi love. It could mean decay but if the tree looks good I'm sure you have many many years before you even have to think about it dieing...many years! I'm new to the blog but I've lived in SH for a year and am an ecology grad student at USF.

DigTheDark said...

Also, almost all the things listed are great on trees...not good for them or bad for them but beautiful...the only thing I would worry about are exotic vines (and some natives such as Virginia creeper and mistletoe - they can kill a tree). But orchids, spanish moss, and any bromiliad-looking things are great. Even moss or algae and mushrooms are fine...all part of the tree ecosystem. Also, those really look like terrestrial orchids popping up around that tree...I have some too but I transplanted them there. Were your's there naturally. Thanks!

Beverly said...

When we bought our home there was a small tree with that same type of fungus, and the home inspector (an arborist by training) told us that it meant the tree was dying, too. :( Good luck figuring that out.

Anonymous said...

This is some interesting stuff I tell ya.
It never ceases to amaze me what I learn on here.

Bloggerwife said...

The tree is a grandfather oak and we will enjoy it as long as it graces this earth. It has shown signs of deterioration since we've been here. The leaf foliage is diminishing each year. It is one of two grandfather oaks that frames the front yard. We were drawn to this house because of those trees and we enjoy many hours sitting on the front porch, looking at the trees and the wildlife that inhabit them. There is a hole in one tree from where a limb was removed and a wound formed. Every year these small twittering black birds come to nest there. They are so much fun to watch.

Digthedark, those are basket plants that I planted around the base of the tree. I'm very fortunate to have a friend who's a master gardener and she shares her plants with others.

Anonymous said...

mm kay

should I aske the landlord to tar up those holes in the huge oak outside?


do misquitos get in there ? and breed?

I see certain fungus in the yard here but I had attributed that to the weather.
hm
ya never know what you gonna learn on this blog..its great.

DigTheDark said...

OK, I'm no arborist, I would trust them instead of me - I'm an animal guy but know alot about plants. I think I was just warning not to take action too soon. I hate to see any old tree come down, even though I know it has to sometimes. We had to take a very old cherry laurel out when we first moved in which was sad but now we use the sun to grow bananas and other things. If your trees are live or laurel oak though you will have to go through the city and all that. I have three grands (1 live and 2 laurels) that keep our energy bills low even in these HOT months).

DigTheDark said...

By the way, looking forward to the plant exchange.

Bloggerwife said...

We decided when we first learned the trees were ill, that we would let them live as long as they could. They might die limb by limb, but we'll leave up what's left until the day comes when there's not enough to salvage. I can't imagine life in this house without those trees. Actually, the entire street would miss them since they are the only large trees fronting a house on this block.
Digthedark, I'm bringing plumbago, dogwood, snowbush, basketplant, walking iris, and some porch type specimans to the plant exchange. What will you have?